Biennial Goes BOOM

Biennial Goes BOOM

Were you there at Liverpool Biennial 2016? What did you see? What did you think?

Well a superb report has just come out of the contemporary art festival’s impact on artists, the city and us mere humans – and it’s a report filled with flying colours & happy faces.

Taken by cultural research specialists BOP Consulting, the epic report was commissioned to gauge the Biennial’s impact across cultural, social and economic areas – the whole shebang. It’s a real eye-opener to how much we value art in our community, and it’s something we can’t wait to shout about (can you hear us?)

We love success stories like this one. So, we’ve broken down Biennial circa 2016:

 

1.2 MILLION PEOPLE EXPERIENCED EITHER A LIVERPOOL BIENNIAL EXHIBITION OR PUBLIC ARTWORK

Now that’s a big number, and there’s no doubt that you could have played a part in it. When you put it alongside the Liverpool population that stood at around 1.3 million in 2014’s Government data report, it means that nearly all of us took the time to encounter some of the most moving pieces of art that the city was adorned with (remember these Arriva busses designed by artists and local schoolchildren?)

4. Artist-designed Arriva buses by Frances Disley, Hato with Childwall Academy and Ana Jotta. Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo Niall Lea
Artist-designed Arriva buses by Frances Disley, Hato with Childwall Academy and Ana Jotta. Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo Niall Lea

 

109,339 PEOPLE VISITED 5.9 TIMES 

When you love Liverpool Biennial, you REALLY love it. That means multiple trips to get your art-fix, and rightfully so. The beauty of Liverpool Biennial means that every art experience is different, and plenty of days within those 14 weeks can be spent perusing its gems at your own speed. It’s art that welcomes you back like an old friend if you so wish.

 

60% CAME FROM OUTSIDE LIVERPOOL 

Which for us and our economy, that’s absolutely brill news – 63% of which even say they’re more likely to visit Liverpool again because of their phenomenal experiences of the festival. Looks like we’ve made some great new friends.

 

41% WERE BIENNIAL FIRST-TIMERS

There’s nothing quite like that sweet sight of Liverpool Biennial for the very first time. That first exhibition that makes your hair stand on end. If you were one of the 41%, what took you so long?

2. Rita McBride, Portal, 2016. Installation view at Toxteth Reservoir. Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo Joel Chester Fildes
Rita McBride, Portal, 2016. Installation view at Toxteth Reservoir. Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo Joel Chester Fildes

 

Ignore The Rolling Stones – WE COULD GET (VISITOR) SATISFACTION 

And it was high satisfaction, with 82% rating their experience as good or very good…

 

…AND 90% SAID WE SHOULD BE PROUD OF OUR ART SCENE 

We don’t really need to explain this bit. But we will add that another 82% of visitors thought that Liverpool should do ‘more of this kind of thing’. Point. Completely. Taken.

 

AND WHAT ABOUT THE ART SECTOR? 

Well that’s where even more amazing news come flooding in. 84% of artists confessing that Biennial enabled them to develop their work, while 92% of young people who worked as mediators in exhibitions believed that the Biennial had improved their future career prospects.

To break it completely down –  the strength of our regional, national and international contemporary art sector has sky-rocketed. You go Biennial ❤️

 

Sally Tallant, Director of Liverpool Biennial is no doubt BURSTING with pride and all things bubbly and happy right now. She had this to say:

“Liverpool Biennial’s remit extends beyond the arts sector and its importance is evidenced through its cultural, social and economic impact. The headline findings evidence the festival’s leading role in the reputation of Liverpool as a cultural destination and the positive impacts of presenting and making high-quality art accessible to a broad range of people within the city and beyond.

“It’s particularly pleasing to see such a diverse audience coming into contact with contemporary art, and the benefits of working with the city’s institutions, businesses and communities to shine a spotlight on Liverpool’s thriving arts scene.”

1. Lara Favaretto, Momentary Monument – The Stone, 2016. Installation view at Welsh Streets, Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo Mark McNulty
Lara Favaretto, Momentary Monument – The Stone, 2016. Installation view at Welsh Streets, Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo Mark McNulty

 

Here’s to 2018.

For information on the upcoming Liverpool Biennial next year, take a look here. For the full AMAZING evaluation, click here.

 

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Published: 20/02/2017

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